Your web-browser is very outdated, and as such, this website may not display properly. Please consider upgrading to a modern, faster and more secure browser. Click here to do so.

Simply One Hell of a Fan

Nerd, spoonie, amateur artist, animal lover, and wannabe Egyptologist with two cats, a growing library, and a strange love for thieves. Background from here.

Answer trivia to feed people. / Click a button to feed animals.


THIEF KING FAN

ROGUE OF RAGE

RAVENCLAW

Posts tagged GPOY

Jul 31 '14
heartnmavin:

snowyanna:

215-to-fit:

rustboro-city:

svviggle:

kastortheunlockable:

stunningpicture:

My 7 year old son was shot down by his 1st grade teacher

The american public education system in a nutshell tho

My third grade teacher actually had a conversation with my mom that I was reading to well and told her to stop having me read at home

My first grade teacher said that it was problematic that I was reading ahead of the rest of the kids in my grade and asked my parents to stop letting me read Harry Potter.
My fourth grade teacher thought it was wrong for my dad to be teaching me complex math because it fascinated me.
My elementary school music teacher hated the way my piano teacher taught me, and how I was more advanced than many of her students, and so told me, in front of my peers and my mother, that I was not good enough to participate in the state solo festival. She would not give me the form. We had to procure it from the district instead. She also hated how I excelled at reading and playing music for the recorder, and so she refused to give me my “belts” (colored beads to signify our level) and humiliated me in front of the class repeatedly.
My eighth grade algebra teacher used to fail me on take home tests because I didn’t solve problems exactly the way she showed us in class; I used methods that we had learned for other types of problems that also applied to these. She took points off my tests because I didn’t bring a calculator even though I got 100% without it, because I was able to do it by hand. I had to call my father, who is an engineer, down to the school to shout her down and give me back my A in the class.
My 10th grade Spanish teacher yelled at me in front of the class numerous times because she didn’t like the way I took notes; she thought that since I didn’t write every word off the slide, I wasn’t getting it all down. I had to explain to her that people who have taken advanced courses, like AP or IB classes, know that in a fast-paced learning environment you need to take quick shorthand notes that contain the necessary information rather than wasting time writing every word. She almost gave me detention.
My 11th grade English teacher gave me a poor mark on my first short essay because she believed that I was looking up unnecessarily complex words in a thesaurus to try and get better marks. The phrases in question: “laced with expletives” and “bombarded”. She wouldn’t hear any defense from me.
My 11th grade history teacher failed me on an essay about the 1950s because I misread the prompt. Except the prompt wasn’t words; it was a political cartoon. One of the figures was clearly president Eisenhower, but the other I couldn’t place. My teacher would not tell us who it was. I labelled him as the governor of Little Rock Arkansas during the integration period, and wrote an essay about that subject. My teacher said that no, it was Joseph McCarthy, and that there was a small picture of the man in our textbook and therefore I should have recognized him instantly. Half the class, apparently, did not.
The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win.

"The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win." 

Fun story time. I loved to read. So much so, I was reading chapter books in kindergarden. I broke the record for reading points in elementary school. They actually had to start making up prizes for me. No one in the history of the school had ever read so many books in a year. Basically, my class liked me because I won those suckers pizza parties in my spare time.
In second grade, I had a teacher named Ms. Mobley who believed all children should be average. She flat out told my father that all children should make C’s, and should never strive for more than that.
Not only was she insane, she also would routinely spell things wrong for us to copy for our spelling tests. Later, when we spelled those words wrong on the test, she would mark us off. Yes, our own teacher was sabotaging us.
I should have been tested for gifted classes, but I was not. Why? Ms. Mobley didn’t believe in “gifted” children.
This teacher had tenure and could not be fired.
Never forget.
"The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win." 

This also applies to the Australian School system.

Ohh, we’re trading stories on how public schools screw with gifted students? I can get in on that~
When I was little, I had undiagnosed chronic illness (later discovered to be juvenile rheumatoid arthritis), which left me frequently absent from school - not from screwing around, but because I was repeatedly in the goddamned ER with fevers of 108, or in the hospital with concussions because my skull was so weak from genetic deformities, or getting multiple surgeries to correct other issues from my deformities. 
My parents were broke as shit. There were times where we had to choose between buying food or buying shampoo. Probably a lot of it because I was uninsurable and spent most of my free time with doctors and/or in the hospital. And yet, the school often forced my parents to pay for summer school to make up for those absences, and threatened me with reformatory “classes” (with the kids who were legitimately causing trouble) or being kicked out of the school in general because I was sick too much.
And yet, I was so advanced in school that I skipped kindergarten, and entered first grade having already read books such as The Hobbit and Born Free. The teacher didn’t believe me; our Accelerated Reader program didn’t even have quizzes on these books, so I went to the high school and used their program to get quizzed, and got well over 90% on both. They decided, in first grade, that I was already at a college reading level.
I got into the gifted program, which was the highlight of my life. That was where I learned about ancient Egypt, which developed into a lifelong obsession. Every year I completed the Accelerated Reader program at least a month before anyone else in my school; I won the school-wide science fairs and spelling bees almost every time; and my standardized testing scores were all at least 64th percentile, but in reading comprehension, vocabulary, etc. were in the 99th percentile and quite literally brought up the average for the whole school. As can be guessed, my grades were all high As.
And I still had to take and pay for summer school.
Partway through third grade, I caught mono, and when you’re already immunocompromised, that shit ain’t good. My liver nearly shut down. I was out of school for a month straight, and spent the next two months only attending school for half days because I was too exhausted to make it through the whole thing.
School was so important to me, though, that we brought all of my assignments home and my parents somehow found the money to hire a tutor to teach me. I kept up with everything and my mother took my completed assignments to the school once a week and brought home the new ones.
Except… my spelling homework. Because the teacher used a book of worksheets, but not EVERY worksheet, and she didn’t feel like marking off what pages I should do, so don’t worry about it. After all, I’m in the gifted program, and 99th percentile in vocabulary/spelling, and win all the spelling bees, so it’s no problem, right?
But when I finally returned to school, I found out that I had been kicked out of the gifted program because my teacher reported that I was failing spelling (because I wasn’t doing my homework).
And that, my friends, was the year my parents decided to use my college fund to put me in private school. (My mom purposely withdrew me the week before standardized testing. Screw your school average.)

heartnmavin:

snowyanna:

215-to-fit:

rustboro-city:

svviggle:

kastortheunlockable:

stunningpicture:

My 7 year old son was shot down by his 1st grade teacher

The american public education system in a nutshell tho

My third grade teacher actually had a conversation with my mom that I was reading to well and told her to stop having me read at home

My first grade teacher said that it was problematic that I was reading ahead of the rest of the kids in my grade and asked my parents to stop letting me read Harry Potter.

My fourth grade teacher thought it was wrong for my dad to be teaching me complex math because it fascinated me.

My elementary school music teacher hated the way my piano teacher taught me, and how I was more advanced than many of her students, and so told me, in front of my peers and my mother, that I was not good enough to participate in the state solo festival. She would not give me the form. We had to procure it from the district instead. She also hated how I excelled at reading and playing music for the recorder, and so she refused to give me my “belts” (colored beads to signify our level) and humiliated me in front of the class repeatedly.

My eighth grade algebra teacher used to fail me on take home tests because I didn’t solve problems exactly the way she showed us in class; I used methods that we had learned for other types of problems that also applied to these. She took points off my tests because I didn’t bring a calculator even though I got 100% without it, because I was able to do it by hand. I had to call my father, who is an engineer, down to the school to shout her down and give me back my A in the class.

My 10th grade Spanish teacher yelled at me in front of the class numerous times because she didn’t like the way I took notes; she thought that since I didn’t write every word off the slide, I wasn’t getting it all down. I had to explain to her that people who have taken advanced courses, like AP or IB classes, know that in a fast-paced learning environment you need to take quick shorthand notes that contain the necessary information rather than wasting time writing every word. She almost gave me detention.

My 11th grade English teacher gave me a poor mark on my first short essay because she believed that I was looking up unnecessarily complex words in a thesaurus to try and get better marks. The phrases in question: “laced with expletives” and “bombarded”. She wouldn’t hear any defense from me.

My 11th grade history teacher failed me on an essay about the 1950s because I misread the prompt. Except the prompt wasn’t words; it was a political cartoon. One of the figures was clearly president Eisenhower, but the other I couldn’t place. My teacher would not tell us who it was. I labelled him as the governor of Little Rock Arkansas during the integration period, and wrote an essay about that subject. My teacher said that no, it was Joseph McCarthy, and that there was a small picture of the man in our textbook and therefore I should have recognized him instantly. Half the class, apparently, did not.

The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win.

"The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win." 

Fun story time. I loved to read. So much so, I was reading chapter books in kindergarden. I broke the record for reading points in elementary school. They actually had to start making up prizes for me. No one in the history of the school had ever read so many books in a year. Basically, my class liked me because I won those suckers pizza parties in my spare time.

In second grade, I had a teacher named Ms. Mobley who believed all children should be average. She flat out told my father that all children should make C’s, and should never strive for more than that.

Not only was she insane, she also would routinely spell things wrong for us to copy for our spelling tests. Later, when we spelled those words wrong on the test, she would mark us off. Yes, our own teacher was sabotaging us.

I should have been tested for gifted classes, but I was not. Why? Ms. Mobley didn’t believe in “gifted” children.

This teacher had tenure and could not be fired.

Never forget.

"The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win." 

This also applies to the Australian School system.

Ohh, we’re trading stories on how public schools screw with gifted students? I can get in on that~

When I was little, I had undiagnosed chronic illness (later discovered to be juvenile rheumatoid arthritis), which left me frequently absent from school - not from screwing around, but because I was repeatedly in the goddamned ER with fevers of 108, or in the hospital with concussions because my skull was so weak from genetic deformities, or getting multiple surgeries to correct other issues from my deformities. 

My parents were broke as shit. There were times where we had to choose between buying food or buying shampoo. Probably a lot of it because I was uninsurable and spent most of my free time with doctors and/or in the hospital. And yet, the school often forced my parents to pay for summer school to make up for those absences, and threatened me with reformatory “classes” (with the kids who were legitimately causing trouble) or being kicked out of the school in general because I was sick too much.

And yet, I was so advanced in school that I skipped kindergarten, and entered first grade having already read books such as The Hobbit and Born Free. The teacher didn’t believe me; our Accelerated Reader program didn’t even have quizzes on these books, so I went to the high school and used their program to get quizzed, and got well over 90% on both. They decided, in first grade, that I was already at a college reading level.

I got into the gifted program, which was the highlight of my life. That was where I learned about ancient Egypt, which developed into a lifelong obsession. Every year I completed the Accelerated Reader program at least a month before anyone else in my school; I won the school-wide science fairs and spelling bees almost every time; and my standardized testing scores were all at least 64th percentile, but in reading comprehension, vocabulary, etc. were in the 99th percentile and quite literally brought up the average for the whole school. As can be guessed, my grades were all high As.

And I still had to take and pay for summer school.

Partway through third grade, I caught mono, and when you’re already immunocompromised, that shit ain’t good. My liver nearly shut down. I was out of school for a month straight, and spent the next two months only attending school for half days because I was too exhausted to make it through the whole thing.

School was so important to me, though, that we brought all of my assignments home and my parents somehow found the money to hire a tutor to teach me. I kept up with everything and my mother took my completed assignments to the school once a week and brought home the new ones.

Except… my spelling homework. Because the teacher used a book of worksheets, but not EVERY worksheet, and she didn’t feel like marking off what pages I should do, so don’t worry about it. After all, I’m in the gifted program, and 99th percentile in vocabulary/spelling, and win all the spelling bees, so it’s no problem, right?

But when I finally returned to school, I found out that I had been kicked out of the gifted program because my teacher reported that I was failing spelling (because I wasn’t doing my homework).

And that, my friends, was the year my parents decided to use my college fund to put me in private school. (My mom purposely withdrew me the week before standardized testing. Screw your school average.)

Jul 29 '14

javeliner:

having difficulty with the transition from ‘impressive child’ to ‘below-average adult’

Jul 28 '14
Jul 26 '14

When contemplating a $15.00 purchase

  • 10-year-old me: Wow idk that's a lot of money
  • 15-year-old me: Kickass, that's so cheap
  • 20-year-old me: Wow idk that's a lot of money
Jul 23 '14
positivity-in-pain:

k-o-colitis:

I officially hate my mailbox.

Word.

positivity-in-pain:

k-o-colitis:

I officially hate my mailbox.

Word.

Jul 22 '14

aaronfunandmental:

i think the worst part about ableism is how many times in my life my own internalized ableism prevented me from asking for the help that would have been the difference between getting better and getting worse.

Jul 18 '14

teaforlupin:

When reading Amelia Peabody books it appears that I must punctuate at least every third paragraph with a cackle of glee.

Jul 18 '14

thestarksbastard:

being a multifandom blog means that there will be times when you forget that you have multiple fandoms and spend 2 hours blogging about one thing

Jul 17 '14

studip:

do u ever come across some people who are just SO wrong that you cant even argue with them because the sheer amount of bullshit they are spewing is overwhelming

Jul 17 '14
I am super fashionable.

(I received the socks yesterday as a birthday present and they’re very comfy.)

I am super fashionable.

(I received the socks yesterday as a birthday present and they’re very comfy.)